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General Assembly Nominating Committee

Entity List and Descriptions

 

Advisory Committee on Litigation Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy (ACSWP) Advisory Committee on the Constitution Advocacy Committee for Women's Concerns (ACWC)
Board of Pensions Committee on Mission Responsibility Through Investment (MRTI) Committee on the Office of the General Assembly (COGA) Committee on Theological Education (COTE)
Educator Certification Committee (ECC) General Assembly Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations (GACEIR) General Assembly Committee on Representation (GACOR or COR) General Assembly Permanent Judicial Commission (GAPJC)
Mission Development Resources Committee Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), A Corporation (A Corp) Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Foundation Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Mortgage Corporation
Presbyterian Committee on the Self-Development of People (SDOP) Presbyterian Council for Chaplains and Military Personnel (PCCMP) Presbyterian Disaster Assistance Advisory Committee (PDA) Presbyterian Hunger Program Advisory Committee (PHP)
Presbyterian Investment and Loan Program Board The Presbyterian Mission Agency Board Presbyterian Publishing Corporation Board of Directors (PPC) Presbyteries' Cooperative Committee on Examination for Candidates (PCC)
Racial Equity Advocacy Committee (REAC) Review of General Assembly Agencies Stated Clerk Nomination Committee

 


Advisory Committee on Litigation

This committee advises the Stated Clerk of the General Assembly regarding participation as an amicus party (friend of the court) in secular litigation related to matters of civil and religious liberty, relations between church and state, and any other matters arising out of the mission and interest of the church.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

The members of the committee, ordinarily, shall be lawyers, and the members shall be experienced in fields related to issues that may be the subject of legal proceedings in which the church is or may become involved. Experience and practice in federal constitutional law helpful, especially first amendment law.

Time Requirement:

Meets at call of committee moderator. The committee ordinarily carries out its work by tele-conference calls, with one face to face meeting every two years.

Nominated by GANC: 6 At-Large—For a six year term.

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Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy (ACSWP)

The Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy (ACSWP) helps guide the whole church toward a robust and relevant understanding of both personal and corporate Christian social responsibility. The committee does this important work by developing and recommending to the General Assembly social witness policy that reflects and applies Gospel sensibilities to ethical concerns in the social order and in the church’s own life.

Together, we work to:
  • Strengthen and support the prophetic voice of the church.
  • Provide an ongoing and consistent capacity for the whole church to study and be in dialogue about the theological and ethical dimensions of emerging issues.
  • Offer advice and counsel on overtures, reports and actions that recommend particular policy directions or forms of social witness.
To accomplish our work we perform the following functions:
  • Prepare policy statements, resolutions, study papers and social involvement monitoring reports for consideration by the General Assembly, the Presbyterian Mission Agency and all councils of the church.
  • Provide advice and counsel to governing bodies on social policy matters and interpret the church’s record on those matters.
  • Assist the PMA and all councils of the church to evaluate and explore new ways to present and interpret the church’s social witness.
Gifts, Experience and Areas of Expertise of Those Who Serve:

The committee is at its best when it is composed of diverse members with a wide variety of gifts, experience and areas of lived and learned expertise. Members engage in and contribute to robust discussions of public policies and their theological implications, providing helpful insights and constructive responses to one another as they seek greater understanding for themselves, the committee and the whole church. Intersectional understandings of race, gender, and LGBTQ issues—which apply to members’ own lives and the life of the church, nation, and world—are welcomed and valued. Skills in writing policy analysis, structuring study guides and shaping creative approaches to the interpretation of church policy are also beneficial to the committee.

Time Commitment and Expectations:

The committee meets three times annually. Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, these meeting were three-day meetings with travel either occurring on or adjacent to the meeting days, depending upon location. Over the past two years the committee has transitioned to a virtual meeting format. It is likely that the future of the committee’s meeting commitments will include a mix of in-person and virtual forums and will provide flexibility to allow full participation without barrier or burden for all members. Members may be asked to take part in committee assignments which may add to the time commitment. In the years when the General Assembly meets, there is an additional 3-day meeting for those attending General Assembly.

Nominated by GANC: 12 At-Large—for a four-year term. Upon invitation, members may serve a second term. No member may serve more than 2 consecutive terms, regardless of the length of the term.

Note: The Committee recognizes that its current composition does not reflect the diversity within our denomination. We are committed to welcoming those with new, distinct and diverse voices so as to enrich, strengthen and broaden the crucial work of the Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy.

Find out more about the Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy.

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Advisory Committee on the Constitution

The Book of Order at G-6.02 provides for the establishment of an Advisory Committee on the Constitution. The Committee is composed of nine (9) voting members, teaching elders and ruling elders in numbers as nearly equal as possible. The General Assembly provides by its own rule for the qualifications of members of the Advisory Committee on the Constitution.

The Organization for Mission of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), IV.C.3.a states the qualifications of members: “The committee is composed of nine (9) voting members who shall be stated clerks or former stated clerks of synods or presbyteries, former members of the Permanent Judicial Commission of the General Assembly, polity professors, or other qualified persons with knowledge of and experience with the Constitution and polity of the church.”

All questions requiring an interpretation by the General Assembly of the Book of Order, including items of new business related to the Book of Order, but with the exception of those pertaining to matters pending before a judicial commission, are referred to the Advisory Committee on the Constitution. The Advisory Committee reports its findings to the General Assembly along with its recommendations and proposals for constitutional change.

The Stated Clerk of the General Assembly refers all timely filed proposals to amend the Book of Order to the Advisory Committee on the Constitution, which examines the proposed amendments for clarity and consistency of language and for compatibility with other provisions of the Constitution.

At least sixty days prior to the meeting of the General Assembly, the Advisory Committee reports its findings to the General Assembly along with its recommendations, which may include an amended version of any proposed constitutional changes as well as advice to accept or decline the proposals referred to the Committee.

Skills & Expertise Needed:
  • Experience and knowledge of polity and history of the church, including experience interpreting the Constitution within the councils of the church
  • Good writing and computer skills
  • Interest and ability to conduct extensive research
  • Ability to communicate effectively and make oral presentations
  • Ability to put in long work days
  • Ability to use electronic communications and access the Internet
  • Demonstrated willingness to work collegially and work through disagreements
Time Requirements:

The workload varies over a two-year cycle. During the year following a meeting of the General Assembly, the time requirements are light, and the work can be accomplished in a couple of conference calls, which may take from 2 to 5 hours each.

During the year that concludes with the adjournment of a General Assembly the time commitments are moderate and some work will be done in conference calls. During this year committee meetings require about sixteen long days of work.

The fall meeting during the year before a General Assembly is typically accomplished over a weekend. The spring meeting before a General Assembly lasts six days to consider proposed constitutional amendments and requests for interpretation of the Constitution.

All members are ordinarily expected to be present through the session of the General Assembly to advise the Assembly and its Moderator on constitutional questions. General Assembly attendance requires an eight-day time commitment.

In addition to attendance at meetings, the work of the committee includes extensive preparation in the form of research and writing of draft responses to proposed constitutional amendments and requests for interpretation by the General Assembly. Assignments need to be completed and submitted before each meeting.

Nominated by the GANC: 9 At-Large—One six-year term.

Find out more about the Advisory Committee on the Constitution.

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Advocacy Committee for Women’s Concerns (ACWC)

The PC(USA) holds itself accountable to its commitments to actively work against sexism and for gender justice through the work of the Advocacy Committee for Women’s Concerns (ACWC). ACWC serves as a prophetic gender justice advocacy and monitoring body to and for the PC(USA).

The committee’s three primary responsibilities include:

  1. serving as a voice of advocacy on existing and emerging issues of gender justice both within the church and society;
  2. evaluating and monitoring policies, procedures, programs and resources regarding the way in which they impact the status and position of women; and
  3. giving the General Assembly and the Presbyterian Mission Agency advice and counsel via overtures, resolutions, and reports recommending policy direction or action on justice issues.

The committee carries out these advocacy and monitoring functions in collaboration with the Racial Equity Advocacy Committee and the Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy.

 
Committee Composition:

ACWC is made up of twelve (12) members, including: two clergy women; the Presbyterian Women Church-wide Coordinating Team Vice Moderator; nine at-large members chosen to balance the committee with regards to geography, race, ethnicity, age, and expertise. At least four members must be people of color. People of all genders are invited to serve on ACWC, but at all times there shall be no more than three members serving who do not identify as women. Members may serve up to two four-year terms.

Skills, Experience, & Expertise Sought:
  • Passion and energy for gender justice advocacy
  • Advocacy experience or eagerness to learn to be an advocate
  • Theological and faith-driven impetus for desire to do gender justice work
  • Intersectional, systemic, and trans-inclusive approach to interrupting patriarchy, misogyny, and sexism work
  • Commitment to remaining informed on current events relevant to gender justice
  • Familiarity with or willingness to become familiar with Presbyterian policy
  • Openness to learning while leading
  • Access and commitment to regularly checking email and joining Zoom meetings necessary
Particular knowledge/experience sought currently:
  • Reproductive Justice;
  • Liberation theologies:
  • Womanist,
  • Mujerista,
  • feminist, etc.
Time Requirement:

ACWC normally meets in-person two times annually for two days each meeting. Several members will also serve as liaisons to other partner entities and will be responsible to attend those meetings (virtual attendance may be possible). Regularly scheduled Zoom meetings are also required. A few members will also attend an Advice and Counsel meeting in April of General Assembly years as well as the General Assembly.

Each term is four years, with eligibility for a second term.

Find out more about the Advocacy Committee for Women’s Concerns.

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Board of Pensions

Four basic functions have been assigned, by the General Assembly, to this board:

  1. design and administer a comprehensive program of pension, medical, and other benefits for ministers, missionaries, and certain other church workers [note: at this point, ministers comprise only 40% of active members];
  2. design and administer a program of financial assistance to help meet needs that are beyond the scope of the pension and benefits;
  3. establish and operate retirement housing for eligible retirees and their spouses [note: the Board no longer owns any retirement housing; this function is now provided by subsidies for housing based on need and used in the location of the members’ choosing], and
  4. receive, invest, and disburse the funds required to support these plans and programs for the sole and exclusive benefit of members and beneficiaries of the assistance and home programs.

In addition to these four functions, the General Assembly has assigned on-going tasks including education functions, staffing of Mission Responsibility Through Investing (MRTI), and certain data collection and publication duties.

Currently 29 At-Large Members, no more than 40% may be teaching elders. One Board member may be nominated upon recommendation of the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board. Election is for a term of four years, with eligibility for a second term, but in no event may a director serve more than eight consecutive years.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Please see the self-assessment list of skills and expertise*. For the terms elected at the 225th General Assembly (2022), there is an emphasis for experience in the health care industry (including delivery of care, and design of plans). Applicants should have a demonstrated experience of working in teams (given the committee structure of this board), and an understanding of the broader church.

Time Requirement:

Regular meetings, 3 days in duration, are held three times a year in early March, in late June or mid-July, and in late October. Executive Committee members meet for 1 day four additional times. Special meetings at the call of the chairperson are rare.

Nominated by GANC: 28 At-Large—For a four-year term.

Find out more about the The Board of Pensions.

*The Board has identified the following list of skills and expertise needed in the upcoming cycle of nominations

  • Accounting
  • Actuarial Sciences
  • Benefit plan design
  • Broad understanding of the church
  • Employee benefits administration
  • Employee benefits administration
  • Health, Death, and Disability Plans
  • Information technology
  • Institutional Investment Management
  • Insurance
  • Law
  • Managing a pension plan or large charitable trust or foundation
  • Marketing and Communications
  • Mental Health services
  • Risk Management

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Committee on Mission Responsibility Through Investment (MRTI)

 

The Committee on Mission Responsibility Through Investment (MRTI) is responsible for implementing General Assembly policy related to the long-term investments of Presbyterian-related entities. MRTI assists the church at all levels to utilize its investments as key instruments to promote its mission goals in society. MRTI provides leadership for effective corporate engagement in partnership with other faith- and values-based investors in the United States, and in collaboration with indigenous churches, ecumenical bodies and local groups in other nations. Engagement focus areas include climate change, human rights, environmental racism, corporate response to Covid-19, and human trafficking prevention.

Committee Composition:

Two (2) from membership of Presbyterian Mission Agency Board; two (2) from the board of Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Foundation Inc.; two (2) from the board of the Board of Pensions; one (1) each named by the Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy, Advocacy Committee Women's Concerns, and Racial Equity Advocacy Committee (usually from the membership of these advisory committees); three (3) At-Large members.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Knowledge of the PC(USA), its policies, structures and reality is desired. Knowledge and experience with social issues, particularly as they relate to corporations is important. Persons with backgrounds in ethics, business, law, investments and advocacy as well as persons who bring experience from congregations with investment policies for their endowments and related institutions (i.e., mid-council, camp/conference center, higher education). MRTI also benefits from members with theological training.

Time Requirements:

Meets up to three times annually—normally two in-person meetings (usually one in the spring and one in the fall) and one electronically.

Nominated by GANC: 3 At-Large—For a four-year term.

Find out more about the Committee on Mission Responsibility Through Investment.

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Committee on the Office of the General Assembly (COGA)

 

“We strive to be a church that better serves the 21st-century PC(USA) through agile decision making, leaner and more flexible national structure that clarifies institutional leadership and roles, and more technically and interactively proficient, clear, current, and compelling communications to the denomination and throughout the world.”—from Stated Clerk J. Herbert Nelson, II’s Vision

The Committee on the Office of the General Assembly (COGA) carries out the assembly’s oversight of the Stated Clerk and the Office of the General Assembly between sessions of the assembly and provides a linkage with the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board. The committee includes fourteen elected members, the Moderator of the General Assembly, and a member of the PMA Board. The Executive Director/President of the Presbyterian Mission Agency sits as a corresponding member.

The Committee on the Office of the General Assembly (COGA) understands ecclesiology as mission, calling us to engage in making the current and future church a more faithful reflection of the body of Christ. Among the specific responsibilities of COGA are:

  • to oversee the annual review of the Stated Clerk and the Clerk’s constitutional responsibilities;
  • to review and coordinate the Stated Clerk’s plans for the General Assembly docket, business referrals and programs;
  • to consult with the Moderator concerning worship and committee leadership at the assembly;
  • to propose to each assembly a location and date for subsequent meetings of the assembly;
  • to consider and approve any staffing rationale changes to the Office of the General Assembly;
  • oversee OGA’s work that supports mid councils;
  • provide advice as the Stated Clerk serves as chief ecumenical officer and head of communion;
  • work with the Presbyterian Historical Society Board to ensure the collection, preservation and sharing of historical and institutional records;
  • and working jointly with the boards of the Presbyterian Mission Agency and the PC(USA), A Corporation to recommend a per capita budget to each assembly.

Foundational to our polity, and critical to discerning the mind of Christ, is the commitment to guarantee full participation and representation in the governance of the church to all persons reflected within its membership’s rich diversity. COGA is committed to raising its awareness about equity, inclusion, and representation and providing a culture of diversity where all voices are valued and together members discern the mind of Christ. COGA seeks persons of strong faith with demonstrated commitments to the values of equity, justice, service, reconciliation, transparency, and discernment. COGA also strives to be good partners with other church entities, including councils of the church, in support of God’s gift of shalom for all of creation.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Persons elected to serve on the Committee on the Office of the General Assembly should: be grounded in the Constitution of the PC(USA) and its polity including the relationships of the church’s councils, ecumenical and justice ministries; demonstrate a commitment to the church’s call to inclusiveness and fair representation in decision making; be able to work well as part of a team that celebrates inclusion, diversity and equity; possess creativity and energy in leadership; demonstrate competence in financial administration, communications and technology; and be able to think strategically about the program and format of General Assemblies. Must be willing and able to engage in individual and communal discernment to seek God’s will during a time of transformation and reformation.

Time Requirement:

At least seventeen (17) days each year (nine (9) in non-General Assembly years) which includes three meetings (Fall, Winter, Spring), attendance at General Assembly, monthly video conferences and regular participation in sub committees. Regular and consistent participation is required; successive unexcused absences are grounds for removal from the committee.

Nominated by GANC: 14 At-Large—for a four-year term. Members may be eligible for second four-year term.

Find out more about the Committee on the Office of the General Assembly.

COGA seeks Persons of color or persons serving in congregations of color or ministries serving communities of color.

In addition, COGA provides this list of various skill sets and/or experiences that would be helpful:

  • Effective strategic communicator, with the ability to identify various audiences, internal and external, and tailor messages for each
  • Ability to understand and craft theological and governance language
  • Commitment to intercultural competence and learning
  • Ability to develop strategies to identify, equip and activate “champions&dquo; who can assist COGA meet its goals
  • Broad understanding of the church and experience at multiple levels of governance (congregation, presbytery, synod, and national/denominational)
  • Broad understanding of Presbyterian Church History
  • Ecumenical and Interreligious commitment
  • Ability to comprehend and interpret budgets and financial reports
  • Understanding of and commitment to PC(USA) polity

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Committee on Theological Education (COTE)

The Committee on Theological Education (COTE) is a General Assembly committee whose purpose is to hold and nurture the PCUSA’s relationship with the institutions of theological education that are in formal relationship with the denomination. It supports communication between the denomination and these seminaries. It seeks to enable these seminaries to support the denomination’s mission through their ministry of education and training, particularly of pastoral leaders. In cooperation with the Presbyterian Foundation, COTE serves as an advocate for theological education, seeking to encourage financial and other support of these seminaries through the Theological Education Fund and the Theological Schools Endowment Fund. COTE reports directly to the General Assembly, and to the Board of the Presbyterian Mission Agency.

The Committee is composed of 7 members elected by and representing the General Assembly (General Assembly Representatives) and the representatives of the institutions of theological education that are Institutional or Covenant Members of COTE. Length of term for General Assembly Representatives: 4-year term. Members elected by GA may NOT be Trustees, Staff, or Faculty of any of the institutions of theological education that are in formal relationship with this denomination through membership in COTE.

Skills & Expertise Needed:/strong> Persons with expertise in processes related to ministry formation in the PC(USA) for example, CPM, COM, board membership, new church development, and church transformation; persons who have experience with academic institutions; persons who have a keen interest in theological education, and church leadership development.

Time Requirement:

Two meetings per year, generally Winter and Fall. Meetings generally happen over a three-day period. COTE business will require time to prepare for these meetings. As pandemic conditions recede it is anticipated that at least one meeting per year will be in person. Possible task force and committee meetings in addition.

Nominated by GANC: 7 elected members. For a four-year term. Terms are staggered.

Find out more about the Committee on Theological Education.

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Educator Certification Committee (ECC)

The Educator Certification Committee establishes the standards of the Educator Certification process. These standards are described in detail within the Educator Certification Handbook, as approved by the Committee. Standards include the oversight of courses offered to fulfill knowledge and skill requirements, designating and connecting with Educator Certification Advisors in consultation with presbyteries, maintaining/establishing communication with certified educators, and evaluating certification examinations. The Committee also maintains relationships with the Association of Presbyterian Church Educators and with theological institutions related to the PC(USA).

Much of the work of the ECC is done through two sub-committees: People Connections and Courses & Exams. People Connections supports relationships and fosters communication among constituent groups connected to the educator certification process, including providing leader training and connecting with mid councils. This group also communicates about and advocates for the educator certification process within PC(USA)-related groups and bodies. The Courses & Exams sub-committee provides oversight and administration of all certification-approved courses and the Christian Education Associate endorsement process. This group reviews and approves course descriptions, syllabi, and instructor qualifications. ECC members are appointed to sub-committees based on their experience, skills, and gifts.

Much of the work of the ECC is done through two sub-committees: People Connections and Courses & Exams. People Connections supports relationships and fosters communication among constituent groups connected to the educator certification process, including providing leader training and connecting with mid councils. This group also communicates about and advocates for the educator certification process within PC(USA)-related groups and bodies. The Courses & Exams sub-committee provides oversight and administration of all certification-approved courses and the Christian Education Associate endorsement process. This group reviews and approves course descriptions, syllabi, and instructor qualifications. ECC members are appointed to sub-committees based on their experience, skills, and gifts.

The Educator Certification Committee is made up of nine (9) members elected in two classes for four-year terms. A committee member may be elected to a second consecutive term. Membership of the Committee ordinarily includes at least one of each of the following: director of Christian education; staff of a middle governing body; pastor serving a church that employs a church educator; faculty or staff member of a Presbyterian Church (USA) theological school; associate pastor of Christian education; racial/ethnic representative. Ex-officio members of the Council include: a representative from the Association of Presbyterian Church Educators and a representative from Union Presbyterian Seminary. The Committee is staffed by the PC(USA) Manager of Ministry Education and Support.

Skills & Expertise Needed: Persons wishing to be considered for the Educator Certification Committee should possess the following skills: knowledge of the content areas necessary for Educator Certification (biblical interpretation; Reformed theology; Presbyterian polity; Presbyterian program and mission; religious education theory and practice; worship and sacraments; experience in Christian education in congregations; and expertise in evaluating educational materials.)

Time Requirement: Meets once a year for three days and at least three times a year electronically (additional sub-committee electronic meetings may also be necessary), with committee work between meetings handled through email and conference calls. In addition, committee members are expected to evaluate Certification exams each year and to work with other committee members to give written feedback to candidates for Certification concerning their work.

Nominated by GANC: 9 At-Large—For a four-year term.

Find out more about the Educator Certification Committee.

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General Assembly Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations (GACEIR)

The General Assembly Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations works to highlight the vision of ecumenical involvement and work within the life of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The committee plans and coordinates the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)’s engagement in ecumenical relations, articulating Reformed and Presbyterian identity in the midst of the church’s ecumenical commitments and provides guidance for the church's conversations with non-Christian religious traditions.

The GACEIR is composed of 20 members: 12 At-Large, 2 – appointed by entities - (1) from the Committee on the Office of the General Assembly and (1) from the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board; 4 - Invited from ecumenical partners (1) and full communion partners (3); 2 - Ex-Officio with Vote - Stated Clerk (or Associate Stated Clerk for Ecumenical and Agency Relations) and Executive Director of Presbyterian Mission Agency or Designee. The Presbyterian Mission Agency may appoint up to 4 additional ministry area directors as corresponding members with voice and no vote.

Skills & Expertise Needed: Persons wishing to be considered for the General Assembly Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations should possess the following: ecumenical consciousness, broad view of the church, understanding of the Presbyterian Church especially as it relates to the Book of Order section F-1.03 and ability to articulate a clear sense of the church and the quest for Christian unity. Persons who understand the religiously plural and culturally diverse time and place in which we live. Writing and other communication skills are often helpful.

Time Requirement: The General Assembly on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations will meet two times a year for a period of 2-3 days each. Subcommittee work usually requires additional time in face-to-face or electronic meetings.

Nominated by GANC: 12 At-Large—For a four-year term.

Find out more about the GA Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations.

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General Assembly Committee on Representation (GACOR or COR)

The General Assembly Committee on Representation (GACOR) assists the national Church in its self-assessment around equity and representation, as we collectively live out our call to “give full expression to the rich diversity of the Church’s membership” [G-3.0103] including in decision-making and employment. GACOR’s role is to continually invite the Church to pursue God’s dream for the Church around wide participation and diversity and to speak clearly to dynamics that impede it.

GACOR works to support, move, and transform the church from within using a variety of strategies, including a significant amount of data-based storytelling around agencies, committees, meetings and synods, offering advice and counsel, consulting in brainstorming and future-visioning processes of the Church, commenting on GA actions, process-observation of national Church meetings (e.g., General Assembly), and embodying the living practice of collaborating and visioning within the deep diversity of GACOR itself.

The committee is outlined in the Book of Order G-3.0103 and in the Organization for Mission (IV.C.5).

Skills & Expertise Needed (skills list with spectrum of experience):

  • Appreciation for cultural/organizational change work and experience in translating into resources
  • Institutional/societal systems analysis, power and privilege work, trauma-informed approaches
  • Connecting skills: listening for understanding, empathy, flexibility, grace, and curiosity
  • Willingness to ask hard questions of systems and leaders, savvy to know when to employ
  • Statistics, data examination/evaluation and interpretation
  • Valuing accountability: evaluating structures/systems for impact, models of church engagement
  • Theological reflection/interpretation: especially structural racism and Doctrine of Discovery
  • Public speaking, writing and web communication in English, Spanish, and/or Korean

Time Requirement:

  • 2 retreats per year (3-4 days or partial days). Normally these retreats are in-person, currently virtual due to covid-19. When travel is renewed, add a day of travel to each meeting.
  • Working groups (1.5 hrs./month, average). Subcommittees and working group work will be by video conference calls. Consultations may add another 1.5 hrs./month (average)
  • Members may be invited to represent GACOR as a liaison to other national church bodies in addition to working group responsibilities. The meeting/time commitment varies by entity.
  • Four executive committee members have additional tasks and a regular meeting.

Nominated by GANC: 16 At-Large, for a four-year term, distributed equally as possible from the following regions:

  • Region 1: Alaska-Northwest, Pacific, Southern California & Hawaii, and Southwest.
  • Region 2: Sun, Rocky Mountains, and Lakes and Prairies.
  • Region 3: Mid-America, Living Waters, and Lincoln Trails.
  • Region 4: Covenant, Trinity and Northeast.
  • Region 5: South Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, and Boriquén (Puerto Rico).

Ordinarily, no two members shall hold membership or reside in the same presbytery. Membership shall be in accordance with the principles of unity and diversity in F-1.0403, with sensitivity to having at least 3 members under 35, minimum proficiency in its membership with at least 2 languages, and at least 1 member who lives with disability or has proficiency in ability issues and concerns.

Find out more about the GA Committee on Representation.

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General Assembly Permanent Judicial Commission (GAPJC)

The responsibilities of the General Assembly Permanent Judicial Commission (GAPJC) are described in the Rules of Discipline section of the Book of Order. Members of the GAPJC shall have experience in interpreting the constitution of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Experience with the Rules of Discipline and the normal functioning of church councils is helpful. The GAPJC shall have an equal number (as nearly so as possible) of minister and elder members with one member at-large elected from each synod for a six-year term.

  • No person who has served on a permanent judicial commission for a full term of six years shall be eligible for reelection until four years have elapsed after the expired six-year term.
  • No person shall serve on more than one permanent commission at the same time.
  • The Moderator, Stated Clerk, or any member of the staff of the General Assembly or any of its entities shall not serve on its Permanent Judicial Commission.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

  • Experience and knowledge of polity and history of the church, including experience interpreting the Constitution within the councils of the church
  • Good writing and computer skills
  • Interest and ability to conduct extensive research
  • Ability to communicate effectively
  • Ability to put in long work-days
  • Ability to use electronic communications and access the Internet
  • Demonstrated willingness to work collegially and work through disagreements

Note: Computer literacy is required, specifically including the ability to use email, and to retrieve documents from secure cloud-based storage systems such as Dropbox. Experience with collaborative document systems such as Microsoft OneDrive is also helpful. This Commission works primarily on an electronic basis.

Time Requirement:

Ten to fifteen days away from home. Meetings usually last four days and normally are held three times each year. Advance preparation must be made for each meeting. This requires an additional eight to twelve days per year. A total of 32 days per year may be required.

Nominated by GANC: 16 At-Large—For a six-year term.

The GAPJC is seeking nominees for: Class of 2026 from the synod of Alaska-Northwest; and, Class of 2028 from the synods of Lincoln Trails, Northeast, Southwest, Sun and Trinity

Find out more about the General Assembly Permanent Judicial Commission (PJC).

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Mission Development Resources Committee

The Mission Development Resources Committee is an advisory committee of the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board. This committee makes decisions on Walton Awards for excellent New Church Developments/Worshiping Communities and Mission Program Grants (New Worshipping Communities, Presbytery-level Transformation). The MDRC is comprised of Ten (10) elected members: Nine (9) At-Large and One (1) Presbyterian Foundation Representative. Members are eligible to serve up to two four-year terms.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Persons with extensive experience in establishing new congregations and/or new worshiping communities, leading congregational transformation, real estate, banking, legal, and an interest and commitment to evangelism and mission through church development. It is helpful if those considering service on this committee have either established a new congregation/community, or led an existing congregation through a transformation effort, or served on a presbytery mission or church development committee. There is a heavy reading workload. This is a working committee that requires a great deal of time commitment.

Time Requirement:

The Mission Development Resources Committee meets face-to-face each spring and fall and will have at least four additional scheduled conference call meetings.

Find out more about the Mission Development Resources Committee.

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Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), A Corporation (A Corp)

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), A Corporation is a corporate entity of the General Assembly. It holds funds and title to property in accordance with the 1986 Deliverance of the General Assembly, its Articles of Incorporation, and its Bylaws. In essence, A Corporation is the “business office” of the denomination. A Corporation is commonly called “A Corp.”

A Corporation, through its Administrative Services Group (ASG), provides the services of Finance and Accounting, Legal Services, Human Resources, Internal Audit, Global Language Resources, Information Technology, Distribution Services, Mail/Print Services, Research Services, Risk and Insurance Management, and Building Services. ASG has around 90 staff. The primary client partners of ASG are the Office of the General Assembly (OGA) and the Presbyterian Mission Agency (PMA). Services are provided on a contract basis to the Presbyterian Investment and Loan Program, Presbyterian Publishing Corporation, and Presbyterian Women. The mission of ASG is to support client partners so that their ministries flourish.

A Corporation has assets of over $550 million. It is the employer of record for over 400 staff in ASG, OGA, and PMA, including overseas coworkers. Some of the initiatives and projects currently underway for A Corp are: Enterprise Risk Management plan, expansion of language translation and interpretation, an assessment of the information technology services, and an inventory and evaluation of all properties held by the A Corporation.

A Corporation is governed by a board of 13 directors, constituted as follows:

  • 5 at large
  • 1 Advocacy Committee for Women’s Concerns
  • 1 Racial Equity Advocacy Committee
  • 1 Committee on the Office of the General Assembly
  • 1 Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Foundation Board
  • 1 Presbyterian Church Investment and Loan Program Board
  • 1 Presbyterian Church Publishing Corporation Board
  • 1 Presbyterian Mission Agency Board
  • 1 Presbyterian Women

Terms of office are four years. The Stated Clerk serves as an ex-officio member of the A Corporation board.

A Corporation Bylaws call for three subcommittees: Audit, Legal and Risk Management; Nominating, Governance and Personnel; Finance, Operations and Budget. All board members serve on at least one committee. Task forces may be established to address a particular issue or need.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

A broad knowledge of the PC(USA) and its structure. Specific expertise and experience in commercial real estate, enterprise level human resources administration, enterprise level information technology, non-profit or not for profit business administration, and fundraising. Our board seeks Directors who are multi-lingual individuals.

Time Requirement:

A Corporation meets in person four times each year (two day meetings), and electronically as needed. Subcommittees may meet electronically in between full board meetings.

Find out more about the PCUSA A Corporation.

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Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Foundation

The Foundation Board is a strategic policy making body, legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust, manage the assets for the benefit of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), governing bodies, local churches and other related entities, and ensure their proper disbursement and use according to donors’ and investors’ intentions.

The Foundation is governed by a Board of Trustees. This Board consists of 19 Presbyterians nominated by GANC and elected by the General Assembly to serve a designated term. The Stated Clerk of the General Assembly, the Executive Director of the Presbyterian Mission Agency, and the President of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), A Corporation, serve as ex officio Trustees. An elected Trustee shall be eligible to serve two full or partial terms, for up to a total of eight years.

Due to the nature of the Foundation’s work, the composition of the Board must reflect expertise and experience among the following areas: Accounting, Banking/Trust, Clergy, Development, Human Resources, Legal, Investment Management, Marketing, and Investments.

Time Requirement:

There are three official board meetings per year, two days each; committees may meet once or twice in between board meetings virtually.

Trustees are expected to attend all board meetings. There may be a need for an occasional excused absence. However, the absence of one or two Trustees can truly hamper the board’s ability to conduct business, since only three to five Trustees are assigned to each standing committee. Trustee attendance will be monitored to maximize the effectiveness of the board.

Trustee Duties and Responsibilities:

The Foundation Board is a policy making body, organized to oversee the fiduciary responsibilities of the corporation. As the fiduciary, the corporation is legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust, manage the assets for the benefit of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), governing bodies, local churches and other related entities, and ensure their proper disbursement and use according to donors’ and investors’ intentions. Trustees’ responsibilities also include understanding the Foundation’s mission, evaluating current business opportunities and threats, and providing the Foundation’s CEO and organization with clear strategic vision.

Board responsibilities as a corporate body are to:

  • Review, evaluate and approve objectives, strategies and major policies for Foundation services, annual forecast of income and expenses, and capital expenditures.
  • Ensure compliance with the reporting requirements of the General Assembly.
  • Assist in acquiring new gifts from Presbyterian entities and individuals by networking with the staff and other resources to refer potential donors and gifts.
  • Collaborate with senior management as they provide strategic direction to the business affairs of the Foundation.
  • Encourage Presbyterians’ participation in Christian stewardship and investment of resources according to the social witness principles of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).
  • Partner with the other agencies of the denomination to strengthen ministry resourcing and opportunities.

Standing Committees:

The Board’s work is conducted through five standing committees which provide leadership, guidance, and decisions on policy and strategic initiatives. The Board’s role is not operational. Board members are to approach key areas of committee responsibility with emphasis on generative, creative, and forward thinking. The five committees include:

Audit & Compliance

  • Reviews the integrity and transparency of the Foundation’s financial statements and financial reporting process
  • Assures compliance with laws and regulations as well as with board policies
  • Manages organizational risk
  • Reviews the qualifications and independence of the financial statement auditor, as well as the performance of the Foundation’s internal audit function and independent auditors

Investments

  • Responsible for development and oversight of Investment Policies
  • Monitors and evaluate performance of outsourced CIO
  • Develops portfolio objectives and monitor the achievement of these objectives
  • Establishes suitable benchmarks for asset/strategy composite and total portfolio performance and measure actual performance against benchmarks
  • For certain investment pools, selects investment managers and measure performance against objectives and benchmarks
  • Monitors effects of the spending policy on the Permanent Endowment Fund and recommend modifications, as necessary

Creative Engagement and Social Witness

  • Identifies and recommends national and global creative investment initiatives
  • Monitors the Foundation’s assets’ compliance with the General Assembly and MRTI principles and policies
  • Communicates the vision of the Foundation
  • Oversight of the Foundation’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion policies and programs

Asset Gathering

  • Oversees Funds Development
  • Develops Partnerships
  • Develops strategies for asset gathering, including Project Regeneration
  • Collaborates in efforts with agencies, institutions and other organizations

Executive Committee (Board Officers & Committee Chairs)

  • Provides oversight of Human Resources functions
  • Oversees annual review of President/CEO
  • Exercises authority of the full board in time-sensitive matters with the exception of actions excluded in the By-laws

Find out more about the Presbyterian Foundation.

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Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Mortgage Corporation

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Mortgage Corporation is a special purpose corporation with a narrowly defined mission. In order to increase the availability of church loan funds it may be necessary, from time to time, to raise funds through the securitization of loans originated by the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Investment and Loan Program, Inc. Therefore, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Mortgage Corporation may purchase and accept the transfer of loans from the Investment & Loan Program and/or Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) middle governing body corporations. Once purchased and transferred, the Mortgage Corporation shall service the loans, while simultaneously selling to a financial institution the right to receive revenues from such purchased loans.

The Board of Directors consists of three (3) members: two (2) members nominated by the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Investment and Loan Program, Inc., and one (1) member nominated by the General Assembly Nominating Committee. The nominations are presented to the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board for election. The terms are for four years although partial terms to fill a vacancy are allowed.

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Mortgage Corporation is a Pennsylvania corporation whose sole member is the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), A Corporation.

The Board meets once a year in times of inactivity. During times when the Corporation is operationally active, the Board will have three stated meetings per year. Generally, only the annual meeting is held in person and in conjunction with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Investment and Loan Program annual board meeting. Support of the mission of the Corporation and Board activities would be best served by those having finance, lending, securitization, legal or PC(USA) Church experience.

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Presbyterian Committee on the Self-Development of People (SDOP)

The National Presbyterian Committee on the Self-Development of People (SDOP) provides the opportunity for the members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and non-members to help establish partnerships with economically poor, oppressed, and disadvantaged people in the United States and around the world, which helps them to develop toward their own potential, self-determination, and human dignity. (People who are not Presbyterian may be nominated, elected, and serve). The National Committee shares this ministry with Mid Council Committees, as the focal point of the Church's efforts to promote the self-development concept and cause. The Committee membership is 16 persons. Each person may be considered to serve up to two four-year terms.

Time Requirement:

Approximately 20-25 days per year. It is important that persons considering service on the National Committee are aware of the great demand on their time and energy. Annually, there are a minimum of three National Committee meetings, two task force meetings, standing committee meetings, and several required site-visits to communities. All are encouraged to submit nomination forms.

Nominated by GANC: 16 At-Large—Over a four-year term.

Find out more about the Self Development of People.

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Presbyterian Council for Chaplains and Military Personnel (PCCMP)

Needed: Presbyterians with passion for ministry to military service members, veterans, prisoners and families to serve on our Council. The PCCMP is committed to ensuring all to whom we minister may practice their faith in peace and be spiritually strong in both times of joyous celebration and while bearing heavy burdens. A cooperative fellowship of four Presbyterian denominations, your Council helps to recruit, equip, enable, sustain, and celebrate the ministry of chaplains and their families in three departments of our federal government. Working with our mid-council leaders, we currently support nearly 150 chaplains serving around the globe. As Matthew 25 ministers, our chaplains are on the frontlines visiting the sick, working with those in prison, and supporting our women, men and their families who experience unique challenges in service to our nation.

Members of the Council provide accountability and oversight as they support PCCMP staff with advice, counsel, and assistance in the provision of ministry. As servants of the church, Council members keep us connected with local congregations and assist in mobilizing support and other resources using their gifts and experience. Six elected members from the PC(USA) will serve on three Council task forces to oversee and implement initiatives in communication, resourcing, and pastoral care.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Familiarity with chaplain ministry, particularly in the federal setting, is helpful but not required. More important is the ability to support our staff in the areas of communicating, resource development, and connecting with our member denominations. Council members should be comfortable in telling our story and acting as conduits to connect us with our partners throughout the church.

Time Requirement:

The Council meets in person for two days once each year. Additionally, the Council has two meetings using electronic means of communicating as well as Task Force meetings (also electronic) as needed up to six times per year. Council members may be requested to voluntarily participate in interviews for prospective chaplains and make occasional visits to partners and congregations telling our story and developing relationships to better serve our members.

Nominated by GANC: Six At-Large—three at each General Assembly for four-year terms. Opportunity for three to be elected in 2020.

Find out more about the Presbyterian Council for Chaplains and Military Personnel.

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Presbyterian Disaster Assistance Advisory Committee (PDA)

The purpose of the Presbyterian Disaster Assistance Advisory Committee is to give policy advice, review the work, assist in setting strategic program direction and planning, and recommend an annual budget. This “is a ministry of relief and response to national and international disasters, aid to refugees and displaced persons, refugee resettlement and efforts toward development.” This ministry is “carried out through ecumenical partnerships, related church agencies, middle governing bodies, and congregations.” Nominated by the General Assembly Nominating Committee and elected by the General Assembly, this committee reports to the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board.

Each member is expected to: 1) review and provide advice for the ongoing work of PDA to ensure that PDA is strategically aligned with the priorities of the Presbyterian Mission Agency 2) assist in setting strategic program direction and planning; 3) review and provide advice as to how designated funds should be/have been spent in large scale disasters (over $500,000) 4) be personally involved in program interpretation of the One Great Hour of Sharing; 5) contribute their knowledge and expertise in disaster relief; and 7) support the development and implementation of communication and fund-raising strategies. The committee is comprised of seven (7) At-Large members. Members are eligible to serve one four-year term and are eligible for consideration to one additional term.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Experience in disaster response or international relief ministries are a pre-requisite for membership on the Advisory Committee. The committee additionally seeks persons with special skills and knowledge in communication/public relations, financial management, and strategic planning.

Time Requirement:

Meets twice a year for 2-3 days each meeting. One to two conference calls between meetings.

Nominated by GANC: 7 At-Large—Over four-year term.

Find out more about the Presbyterian Disaster Assistance Program.

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Presbyterian Hunger Program Advisory Committee (PHP)

The Presbyterian Hunger Program Advisory Committee provides wisdom, passion, support, humor and care as the Presbyterian Hunger Program (PHP) works in the world to alleviate hunger and eliminate its root causes. With the help of inspiring partners in the US and around the world, we have identified “root cause” hunger issues including: climate change, reclaiming land unjustly “grabbed” from the poor, international trade agreements, corporate responsibility, fair wages, worker rights, food sovereignty, environmental justice, and economic/lifestyle choices of consumers. The PHP Advisory Committee reviews, allocates and evaluates the disbursement of One Great Hour of Sharing grant funds—learning alongside PHP staff, grant partners, and ecumenical colleagues about the strongest models for sustainable development, capacity building, and long-term social change.

PHP seeks to strengthen root-case hunger work in congregations, presbyteries and partners through: domestic and international grants, a national network of Hunger Action Advocates, certification programs for Earth Care Congregations and Hunger Action Congregations, education and advocacy resources, webinars, reflection-action trips, and staff leadership (at conferences, presbytery meetings, and congregations). The holistic work of PHP covers five core program areas: Direct Food Relief, Development Assistance, Hunger Education, Corporate and Public Policy Advocacy, and Lifestyle Integrity.

Each member of the Advisory Committee:

  • Reviews funding applications from possible grant partners in the US and around the world and makes recommendations on which grants best meet current needs in the world and PHP goals;
  • Makes every effort to attend 2-3 day meetings twice a year (usually March/April and September)—while these had always been in-person meetings and there is desire to return to atleast one of them being in-person post-covid, the meetings made be made available virtually as well;
  • Attends two or three conference or video calls to keep in touch with key happenings in church and society and how it impacts PHP work;
  • Shares the incredible work of our grant partners with Presbyterians, promoting contributions to One Great Hour of Sharing and the Hunger Fund; and
  • Encourages Hunger Action Advocates, Earth Care Congregations, Hunger Action Congregations, PHP donors, PHP work assigned to staff, and any others who are engaged in PHP’s work.

The PHP Advisory Committee is responsible to the Compassion, Peace and Justice Ministry Area within Presbyterian Mission Agency and carries out the following tasks: 1) recommending PHP operating guidelines; 2) making and reporting funding (grant) decisions within the approved guidelines; and 3) suggesting the development of programs and strategies for implementing the “Common Affirmation on Global Hunger,” and other General Assembly policies related to hunger, poverty, and the environment. The Advisory Committee is composed of 8 members (up to/no more than 9), typically Presbyterian.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Members are selected because they are passionate, experienced, knowledgeable, and interested in domestic and international development issues, hunger and poverty ministry, environmental ministry, or other related “root causes of hunger.” They are also recruited for their regional distribution, their racial ethnic identity, their gender identity, and their status as lay or clergy persons.

Time Requirement:

PHP meets two times annually for longer times and particular focus (March/April for an educational meeting and September for a grants meeting). PHP also typically holds two or three conference/video calls each year for the AC. Reading grants in the mid to late summer is shared among committee members and requires a minimum investment of several hours per person.

Nominated by GANC: 8 (at most 9) At-Large members, each for a four-year term, with the possibility of a second term for a total of eight years of service.

Find out more about the Presbyterian Hunger Program.

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Presbyterian Investment and Loan Program Board

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Investment and Loan Program, Inc. provides the opportunity for individual Presbyterians, congregations, presbyteries and synods with financial resources to become partners with growing congregations in financing capital projects. The Program provides low cost loans to congregations, presbyteries, and Presbyterian entities for purchasing, building or remodeling physical space, or for refinancing existing debt. Whether it is a new kitchen, a classroom or new worship space, a loan from the Program is available at the right time, with the right terms and the right mission focus for your leadership team.

The Program raises the funds for lending by selling investments. Each investor becomes a part of the mission of building churches. Investors become more engaged in their congregations and increase their ownership of the church's mission. The Program encourages stewardship of accumulated resources.

The Board of Directors consists of fifteen (15) members:

  • 8 Nominated by GA Nominating Committee: 6—At-large nominations for two four-year terms; 1—Synod representative for two four-year terms; 1—Presbytery representative for two four-year terms
  • 2 Presbyterian Mission Agency Board nominated by Board from its membership (one term)
  • 3 PILP/at large—nominated by PILP Nominating Committee [ALP] (up to two terms)
  • 2 Foundation nominated by the Foundation Board

The Stated Clerk of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and the president of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), A Corporation are ex-officio members of the board.

The Investment and Loan Program is a nonprofit Pennsylvania corporation whose sole member is the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), A Corporation.

Directors serve a four-year term and are eligible to serve two terms, full or partial. The Board of Directors has three stated meetings annually with called meetings as necessary. The stated meetings are generally held in person over a two-day period. All called meetings are held by either phone or video conference. The mission of the Corporation is best served by a board that is diverse in experience, race, ethnicity, gender and age.

Directors with experience in lending, finance, commercial real estate, accounting, law, construction or PC(USA) Church leadership functions would find an opportunity to utilize their skills to further the mission of the Corporation.

Find out more about the Investment and Loan Program.

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The Presbyterian Mission Agency Board

Mission has always been at the heart of who we are as Presbyterians. For over 175 years, the Presbyterian church has served Christ by engaging in mission around the world. Today, the Presbyterian Mission Agency grounds its work in the vision of Matthew 25 (:31–46), which calls us to actively engage in the world around us by serving people who are hungry, oppressed, imprisoned or poor. Matthew 25 provides a sound biblical and theological basis for the Presbyterian Mission Agency’s three areas of focus: Building Congregational Vitality, Dismantling Structural Racism and Eradicating Systemic Poverty. The Mission Agency serves the church through a broad range of ministry programs, including leadership development for women and people of color, the sending of international mission co-workers and young adult volunteers, Presbyterian Disaster Assistance, 1001 New Worshiping Communities, and many more.

The Board

Presbyterian Mission Agency Board members serve for a term of four years and may be reelected for one additional four-year term. The Board will meet quarterly, including an annual mid-year orientation/planning meeting. Some meetings may be held by electronic means.

Members typically serve on one Program Committee and one Administrative Committee or as representatives on other boards or committees of the church or church-related organizations. The 23 elected board members are diverse in age, geography, race and experience. The board will transition to 20 members by the 225thGeneral Assembly (2022).

Foundational Virtues are necessary in any candidate as the PMAB seeks to embody new initiatives.

  • Confessors: Not only because we come from a confessing tradition, but more so, the church will never begin to heal, repair, and transform without first identifying the internal/external historical, cultural, societal, and political issues at hand. Further, people who confess need to have the grit and grace to shepherd others to confession as well in order that the corpus can come to terms with our collective wrongs. We need confessors.
  • Diviners: Taken from the indigenous understanding as a person who “heals”, the church needs to commit to repairing the breeches. Through both narratives and actions of community engagement and restorative justice, the church can be guided towards both reconciliation and healing. We need diviners.
  • Transformers: Not to be mistaken for movie machines but instead the way the church will proceed residing in a constant of confession and healing. To actualize this, catalysts are required in order that this transformation is both personal, corporate, and societal. In other words, the desire is for everyone’s life to be changed according to the vision of God in Jesus Christ. We need transformers.
  • ADAPTERS: This was put last on purpose as to make certain that the church be on a pathway to what proceeds. Confession, divining, and transforming are all a prelude for the church being able to adapt from the old to the new, from the corporate days, to the missional age and beyond. With that stated, the mantle of artist, poets, musicians, pastors, and other creatives will be called upon to docent the church away from the continuous state of theories and construct towards creation and change. We need adapters.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

The church will be best served by a Presbyterian Mission Agency Board whose members constitute a wide range of experience and skills. We are particularly seeking persons with these skills in 2022:

  • Advocacy/ministries of compassion
  • Church development and transformation
  • Communications/marketing/public relations
  • Finance/accounting
  • Funds development
  • International mission
  • Law
  • Management and leadership in complex organizations
  • Youth/young adult ministry
  • Service on other boards, particularly of large organizations

Goals

Our current mission work plan goals focus on Evangelism and Discipleship, Leader Formation, and Justice and Reconciliation with a particular emphasis on alleviating poverty, eliminating structural racism and building congregational vitality.

Size and complexity

The Presbyterian Mission Agency has 257 employees plus 77 mission co-workers and international and national volunteers and scores of programs. The agency’s budget for 2021 is $65,805,185 and $69,302,045 for 2022, with revenues from a variety of sources and funds. Four ministry areas carry out our work: Racial Equity and Women’s Intercultural Ministries; World Mission; Compassion, Peace and Justice and Theology, Formation and Evangelism. They are supported by finance, human resources, law and other functions provided by staff of the church corporation.

Expectations of Elected Presbyterian Mission Agency Board members:

  • Able to fulfill one four-year term (those elected at the 2022 General Assembly will complete their term at the close of the 2026 General Assembly).
  • Minimum mandatory commitment to spend 12 days a year attending Presbyterian Mission Agency board meetings.
  • Service on at least one other related committee, requiring up to six additional days per year.
  • Attendance at regular meetings of the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board.
  • Willingness and ability to serve on various task forces, other boards, and committees.
  • Comfort, desire, and willingness to be an ambassador on behalf of the Presbyterian Mission Agency to and with other groups across the church.

In addition, board members are expected to be faithful and accountable as outlined in the Presbyterian Mission Agency Manual of Operations and the Ethics Policy for Elected and Appointed>.

Diversity:

In response to the church’s commitment to diversity and inclusivity, the Presbyterian Mission Agency especially seeks persons of color, persons with disabilities, and younger teaching and ruling elders.

Find out more about the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board.

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Presbyterian Publishing Corporation Board of Directors (PPC)

The Board of Directors governs a publishing corporation that is the denominational publisher of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The Presbyterian Publishing Corporation (PPC) produces both educational and worship resources for Presbyterian congregations and members, and theological and religious books and other materials for a wide ecumenical audience. Its imprints and product lines currently include Westminster John Knox Press (a respected publisher of biblical studies, theology, preaching, and social justice books), Flyaway Books (children’s book imprint), Growing Faith Resources (publisher of the official denominational curriculum), and PCUSAStore.com (the retail site for books and resources from the denomination).

The Board is currently composed of 12 persons. Directors will be nominated by the General Assembly Nominating Committee and elected by the General Assembly. Up to two four-year terms.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

Expertise in publishing, business, finance, academic religion disciplines, Christian education, pastoral ministry, funds development, and law.

Time Requirement:

Four two-day face-to-face meetings per year (total of eight days). Occasional meetings for board committees (2 times per year, 1-2 hours each).

Nominated by GANC: Up to 12 At-Large—Over four-year term.

Find out more about the Presbyterian Publishing Corporation.

The PPC has asked that the following skills sets be measured:

  • Broad understanding of the church
  • Business
  • Christian Education
  • Knowledge of Academic Religion fields and/or seminary leadership
  • Finance
  • Law
  • Funds Development
  • Pastoral Ministry
  • Publishing

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Presbyteries' Cooperative Committee on Examination for Candidates (PCC)

This Committee prepares and administers the written examinations that comprise one of the requirements for ordination to the Ministry of Word and Sacrament in the Presbyterian Church (USA). [See G-2.0607d] The Committee has twenty-four (24) members. Twelve (12) members of the Committee are elected (on a rotating basis) from among readers in six regional groupings of presbyteries. The other twelve (12) members are elected by the General Assembly, with consideration being given to areas of needed expertise, to gender and racial/ethnic representation, to an approximate balance of ruling and teaching elders, and to various sub-cultures within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) with regard to the overall composition of the PCC. There is particular need for persons who have post-graduate expertise in one of the four areas tested by the four senior ordination examinations: Biblical Exegesis (including use of biblical texts in their original languages), Theological Competence (with special emphasis on Reformed theology), Church Polity, and Worship and Sacraments. The focus of the four senior ordination examinations is to determine one’s entry-level readiness for ministry in the Presbyterian Church (USA). The exams present pastoral challenges whereby candidates may demonstrate how they integrate their faith and theological education in practical ministry.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

The members of the Committee are expected to have training/expertise and/or significant practical experience in at least one of the four areas of examination. Members must have the ability to write resource papers to be used for preparation by the reading groups and give online presentations on the examinations as a part of training for readers. The ability to read and assess someone else’s work without imposing one’s own point of view is critical. The work of the PCC requires inclusion of members who are bilingual in Korean/English or Spanish/English.

Time Requirement:

Annual Meeting of six days in March; participation in review of reader comments during three exam evaluation periods each year (first week of February, May, and October, working from home using online technologies); preparation of resource papers, questions and presentations for training of readers (seven to ten days total on flexible scheduling).

Nominated by GANC: 12 at-large members in two staggered classes of six members each, serving four-year terms.

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Racial Equity Advocacy Committee (REAC)

The Racial Equity Advocacy Committee (REAC) is a prophetic voice of racial justice advocacy to and for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Working against the sins of racism and white supremacy, REAC boldly seeks justice with equity for people of color in the church and larger society.

REAC’s Primary Functions:

  • The committee advocates within and for the denomination, maintaining an active witness for racial justice in the church. REAC speaks up on issues, dynamics, and practices in the church and in society that negatively impact the quality of life, rights, and dignity of people of color. Areas of advocacy have included workers’ rights, Black maternal and infant mortality, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women/girls/two-spirit people, environmental racism, institutional race auditing in the PC(USA), rights for Transwomen of Color, fairness in the ordination process, and immigration policy.
  • REAC names and challenges practices that adversely affect the quality of life and restrict full participation of people of color in the life of the church.
  • The committee recommends to the General Assembly new policy and necessary revisions to existing racial justice policies and monitors the implementation of policies already adopted by the church.

REAC has direct access to the General Assembly and the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board by means of reports, resolutions, and advice and counsel. REAC also works closely with the Advocacy Committee for Women’s Concerns (ACWC), the Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy (ACSWP), the General Assembly Committee on Representation (GACOR), and the Mission Responsibility Through Engagement committee (MRTI).

Committee Composition:

The committee is composed of twelve (12) members eligible to serve one or two four (4) year terms.

REAC membership includes two members from each of the following constituencies: African American/Black, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino/a American, Middle Eastern American, and Native American. One of these two members is a representative from one of the five General Assembly recognized Caucuses Representing Communities of Color within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and the other is at-large, nominated by the General Assembly Nominating Committee (GANC) process and elected by the General Assembly.

Two additional members are at-large, nominated by the GANC and elected by the General Assembly.

Terms are four years with eligibility for one additional term.

Skills & Expertise Needed:

  • Demonstrated commitment to racial justice as an essential expression of Christian discipleship and faith
  • Understanding of the systemic and structural nature of racism and white supremacy
  • Intersectional understanding of how systemic oppressions operate simultaneously and in inextricably linked ways (such as sexism, ableism, heterosexism/homophobia, classism, ageism, etc.)
  • Energy for ongoing and persistent advocacy work
  • Commitment to being responsive to current events or pressing issues as they occur
  • Willingness to work collectively to articulate a theological understanding of systemic racial justice and to recommend strategies for to how disrupt and dismantle systemic racism both in the church and society
  • Familiarity with or a willingness to become familiar with the denominational policy witness
  • Desire to learn while leading
  • Writing ability
  • Regular access to and commitment to regularly check email. Experienced in digital communication.

Time Requirement:

The committee ordinarily meets two times in person annually in addition to digital meetings as needed. Most members will also serve in a liaison capacity to a partner entity. The total time commitment may range from 12-15 days per year. Some members will also attend the General Assembly every two years.

Find out more about the Racial Equity Advocacy Committee.

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Review of General Assembly Agencies

Based on a six-year schedule, the agencies of the General Assembly will be reviewed to evaluate the relationship of their individual ministry with the mission of the whole Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). On nomination of the General Assembly Nominating Committee, the General Assembly will elect two committees each to review the work of one of the of the General Assembly. Each committee will be composed of twelve members: four commissioners from the previous three General Assemblies, four who have served on the board of a General Assembly entity other than the one being reviewed, and four at-large. The at-large members may include ecumenical partners.

Note: the 225th General Assembly will have an amendment that if approved will require the GA Nominating Committee to nominate 8 at-large members to three Review Committees.

The agency review committees for this cycle are:

The Board of Pensions and the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Foundation. If the amendment is approved the Presbyterian Investment and Loan Program will be included in this cycle of the review process.

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Stated Clerk Nomination Committee

The Stated Clerk of the General Assembly is elected by the General Assembly for a term of four years and is eligible for election to additional four-year terms. The General Assembly Nominating Committee presents a slate of nominees for the Stated Clerk Nomination Committee to the General Assembly that meets prior to the end of the term of a Stated Clerk for election by that Assembly.

The Standing Rules of the General Assembly state [H.2.b.(3)(a)] “The slate of nominees for the nomination committee shall consist of the following:

  • three members of the Committee on the Office of the General Assembly (nominated by the Committee on the Office of the General Assembly, one of whom shall serve as moderator of the committee),
  • one member of the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board (nominated by the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board),
  • and five at-large members nominated by the General Assembly Nominating Committee in the following categories: one mid council stated clerk, and and four persons (two ruling elders and two ministers of the Word and Sacrament) from among commissioners who have attended an assembly in the past six years.

The General Assembly Nominating Committee shall present to the assembly for election the slate of nominees for the Stated Clerk Nomination Committee. The slate presented shall reflect the denomination’s commitment to inclusiveness.”

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